Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Become super-efficient with templates


In my most recent article, “The three core components when transitioning to electronic health records,” I talked a lot about efficiency and consistency. For all the Dentrix users, I want to give you some help when it comes to building templates, which can be a huge time-saver in your office. Here are some of my favorite template tips.

·         Procedure Note Templates – This is my favorite place for the clinical team to document the procedure’s clinical justification (diagnosis, clinical narrative, and remarks for insurance claim). I like it to be documented here because the diagnosis will follow the procedure from treatment planning all the way into history. Also, this note box will download directly into the insurance claim for “Remarks for Unusual Services,” which is required for many procedures. There are two ways to add some reason templates into this area. One is to open the Office Manager > Maintenance > Practice Setup > Custom Notes > Procedure Notes then click add to add a new narrative, or from the patient chart, double-click on a treatment planned procedure and click on the Procedure Note button. Either way, you will open a new box that looks like this:


I want the clinical team to be able to enter information as quickly as possible. Using these Procedure Note templates will help by creating a mouse-driven system instead of typing on the keyboard.

·         Clinical Note Templates – Like I said above, my goal with the clinical team is to be able to enter critical information with the click of a mouse instead of spending too much time typing. This is why my next favorite template is the customizable Clinical Notes Templates. Many of the dental practices I work with use templates that are attached to the procedure codes, so when a procedure code is set complete, it automatically sends a customized template to the clinical note and then the team member must add in the variables for the patient. But what if you could build a template that would include the variables and all you had to do was click with your mouse from a list and then it would build a custom clinical note for the patient with very little typing? By using the Clinical Note templates in the patient chart, this can be a reality. For a step-by-step instruction sheet on building this type of clinical note template click here to email me directly.


·         Procedure Buttons – With G4, you can have as many buttons as you wish so this list should be the most common procedures you chart as existing, treatment plan, or conditions. Do you want to know how the buttons can be super-efficient? Use a multi-code on a button, then you can treatment plan two to eight procedures with the click on one button. How efficient is that? Also with G4, you do not have to create the buttons on each workstation individually, you create button sets and then can select the button set you want for each workstation.

To edit the procedure buttons in your office, go to the patient chart > Setup > Procedure Buttons setup > then there is a drop-down menu at the top of the box where you can select the button set you want to use on this workstation. Now you can add, edit, or delete buttons as you wish. Remember, always making sure you click save before you close!
 

·         Health History Update using the Questionnaire Module – The health history update is something that needs to be updated or reviewed at every patient visit. With many offices eliminating the paper chart, there needs to be an efficient way to document the health history. The reason I like the Questionnaire Module is because it is a set, templated form and it will auto-fill the patient answers from the last visit. This will save the clinical team member an enormous amount of time retyping information like medication lists and allergies.

I hope these template tips will help your office become more efficient and consistent with your daily charting tasks. If your office has temporary employees fill in for someone out sick or on leave, using templates will also guarantee that the documentation stays within your office protocol.

 

8 comments:

  1. Is it true that dentists who purchase electronic dental record systems cannot expect a return of investment?

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  2. I think your question is subjective in the sense that an ROI can come in many forms. If a dentist is expecting the EHR system to eliminate overhead expenses by reducing the need for employees than I would agree they cannot expect that. There is an organization that does provide statistical information on cost savings for transitioning to an EHR system, their website is http://www.ecodentistry.org/.

    I have worked in the dental practice for over 20 years with paper charts and electronic charts and the efficiency in systems and the consistency with documentation is far superior with electronic charting if the process are developed properly. This form of ROI in my opinion far outweigh any expected cost savings.

    I hope this helps,
    Dayna Johnson

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  3. Thank you for all the time you put into your blog! I just found it and have loved reading. I was just promoted to a practice manager so this is all very useful information for me. I may think I know what I'm doing but extra information never hurt. Keep up the good work!

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    Replies
    1. Holly,

      Thank you for your kind words. I have really enjoyed writing the blog and I am so happy the information has been useful in your office.

      Dayna

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  4. We have gone paperless. I have a question with the health history update. Is it enough to just review the online health history update without a signature. Right now we are printing the health history forms and having them sign them every 2 years. What is the protocol you suggest following?

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    Replies
    1. Rikelle,

      In my state of Washington we do not have a requirement for signatures on Health History Updates so my protocol is review and document only using the Questionnaire module. However, state law varies on this subject so check your state law.

      Whether you need to have the patient sign it or not my protocol would be to integrate the Questionnaire module because it requires less paper, scanning and is much more efficient.

      Hope this helps,
      Dayna Johnson

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  5. I'm new with Dentrix. Where do I find the health history questionnaire and how do use the Health History Update using the Questionnaire Module ? please help me

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  6. If you read back in my blogs I wrote in Febuary 2012 they are all about clinical charting and the Questionnaire module, this should help you understand it better.
    Thank you,
    Dayna Johnson

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